Retro Review: Freddy’s Dead the Final Nightmare (1991)

Where in the hell has the time gone.  Time and time again these anniversaries come across my desk and I think, “has it really been that long?”

25 years since Rachel Talalay shit all over the Nightmare franchise that gave her, her start.

1991, I was an 11 year old Freddy fan who at the time, held the series to a certain standard.  It had been two years since the Dream Child and I was ready to see Lisa Wilcox return as Alice and watch her send Freddy back to hell for good.  When I heard about the movie, it was before I saw a cast list or trailer.  I already had my ideas.  I remember thinking, “Freddy’s Revenge wasn’t great, two years later, Dream Warriors came out.  Now, Dream Child wasn’t that great, so Freddy’s Dead should be awesome, right?

When I finally saw the trailer, I was stoked and there was going to be 3D…damn.  Well, I missed it in the theater and had to wait for home video.  I went to the video store, Saturday Matinee and pre-ordered a copy.  I put my hard earned five dollars down and the guy told me my balance was $96.  I pulled my pre-order and ended up renting it when it was released.  I remember looking at the case for, at least 5 minutes without blinking.  I was holding the last Freddy movie.

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I got home and I made a big deal out of it, started from A Nightmare on Elm Street and did my first ever marathon.  It did not disappoint, I loved every minute of the movie.  My 11 year-old mind loved the humor and the new cast.  Sure I was disappointed in the direction, as it seemed to really be set in a different time.  As an adult it is a little different.  The movie is probably the weakest of the series and the humor is, well, cartoon humor.  Freddy played Nintendo and had his own “power glove”.

For those who have never watch Freddy’s Dead, here are a few mistakes the movie made.

  1. It picks in the year 1999 and doesn’t follow a single character from past movies.
  2. This one is about family, the town of Springwood has no children, Freddy needs to move, he finds his Daughter.
  3. Too many jokes, like I said, cartoon Freddy.  Even his make-up was cartoony
  4. Turning down Peter Jackson’s script for the Dream Lovers.
  5. Letting Rachel Talalay direct.
  6. The score was unlike the others, only playing a familiar part of the series once.
  7. Freddy does not use his glove to kill.
  8. No jump roping kids, only Nightmare film without the kids jumping rope.
  9. Not using A Nightmare on Elm Street in the title.
  10. Killing Freddy.

Like I said, the movie follows a “John Doe” who will not sleep, his dreams are crazy and fears dying.  Eventually he meets Maggie who works at a shelter for troubled teens and they try to go back to the place from his dreams, Springwood.  In the van they find some stowaways, Spencer, Carlos and Tracy.  Maggie orders the stowaways to go back to the shelter, but they get trapped in this loop and end up staying the night in a certain house on Elm Street.  Two of the kids, Spencer and Carlos die, Spencer in a tripped out, video game and Carlos with a hearing aid…no glove.  Freddy never uses his glove to kill anyone in the entire movie, it is used mostly to hurt himself.

Maggie and John end up at a orphanage and they find a child named K. Krueger was there.  John thinks it is him and he is Freddy’s kid…nope.  John dies and Maggie goes back to the shelter.  Everyone forgets about John, Carlos and Spencer.  Maggie realizes in a dream that she is Freddy’s daughter and he tells her, she has led him to more children and that, “Every town has an Elm Street.”  But she decides to fight back, by the way, Freddy kills no one the rest of the movie.  One of Maggie’s co-workers helps her and she goes into his brain somehow with 3D glasses and we see what made Freddy crazy.

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They pull Freddy out of the dream and kill him, the end.

Freddy’s Dead, I am not sure why they killed him off.  New Line is the house that Freddy built and eventually they were sold to Warner.  To me this movie was the official end of the 1980s horror films.  Sure Jason Goes to Hell came after, but this one put the nail in the coffin.  I think Freddy and the Nightmare movies belong in the 1980s, Jason films can survive now more than Freddy.  But please prove me wrong.

I like Freddy’s Dead.  It is not the best, it is the worst, but it is fun and entertaining, even 25 years later.

IMDB.com has a rating of 4.9

I do have a higher score of 5.6

I miss Freddy movies and they will never be the same, if we get more.

About Ray Marek III 299 Articles
There is so much more about me. I hate this phrase, but I am an aspiring comic book writer. Problems with finding artists and getting published have held me back. Writing comics has been a dream for, well as long as I can remember. Now I am writing with a great team, Apogee Comics and hopefully we will make some noise in the same way Image comics did in the 1990s. One day, Rage of Rayzor and the Horror Syndicate will lead me to my dream. Support me, by sharing this site, liking and sharing posts, even following me on twitter would help @Rayzor_33. But you want to know about the horror…right? I have been watching horror films since I was 6 years old. The story, one Saturday night, my mom and I were watching movies and she fell asleep on the couch. We had the channel set on HBO and the movie we were watching ended and the next one, A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge. This was some time in 1986. I watched then entire film, I was sitting on the edge of my seat. When my mom woke, she asked me what just ended and I told her, “Freddy”. That was all I talked about for weeks and finally she broke down and rented more horror films for me. She rented, the Texas Chainsaw Massacre part 2, Re-Animator, Friday the 13th VI: Jason Lives and Halloween II. I watched all and fell in love with horror films forever. When my little brother was 2, I was 10, so were talking 1990. He was introduced to Halloween and I made him believe Haddonfield, IL was a real place. We lived in Illinois at the time and this terrified him. After the intial shock, he grew older and more interested in horror films. When he was 8, we went to the local video store and made our way to the horror section. We started with Alien and worked our way through the alphabet of horror. That day we basically started our course in horror. 5 Horror Films to Watch Inferno (1980) A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) The Beyond (1981) Friday the 13th VI: Jason Lives (1986) Horror of Dracula (1958)